Beyond IQ

Last updated: 7/25/02

Beyond IQ: Gender Issues Among Highly and Profoundly Gifted Children

Seattle, WA

August 2 - 4, 2002

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Tentative Adult Program Schedule

See below for more program info!

 

 

 

 

Saturday

Time

Room

Presenter(s)

Topic

9:00

to

10:00

 

Josh Shaine

What to Look For at Your First Conference

 

TBD

So You're a Conference Veteran… Now What?

10:20

to

11:20

 

 

Lynette Henderson

Keynote: Neurobiological Correlates of Intelligence: Implications for Policy and Practice

11:40 to 1:10

 

Lunch

1:30

to

2:30

 

David Albert

Letters from the Front: A Dialog on Young Teens

 

Anna Caveny

Underachievement: Understanding Motivational Paralysis

2:50

to

3:50

 

Fernette Eide

Functional Brain Imaging & The Different Ways We Think

 

Michael Rios and Sarah Taub

Being Different: How extreme giftedness changes the way we, as adults, perceive, believe, work, play, and love

4:10

to

5:10

 

Sanford Cohn

TBD (Discussion)

 

Sarah Taub and Michael Rios

Being Different: Personal Explorations and Strategies for Highly Gifted Adults

 

 

 

 

Sunday

Time

Room

Presenter(s)

Topic

9:00

to

10:00

 

Nathan Levy

Practical Ways to Reach Highly Gifted Children in Class, School, and Out of School

 

David Albert

Writing, Reading, and All That

10:20

to

11:20

 

Sue Jackson

TBA

 

TBA

Education Panel

11:40 to 1:10

 

Lunch

1:30

to

2:30

 

Lynnette Henderson

Discussion

 

Debbie Notkin

The Role of Imaginative Literature in Forming Gender Identity/Gender Expectations

2:50

to

3:50

 

Josh Shaine

The Oxymoron of "Straight Talk" - Non-linear Thinkers in a Linear World

 

Kara Sheehan

Cuckoo Eggs in the Family Nest: Working with our beliefs and emotional responses

4:10

to

5:10

 

Sanford Cohn

Keynote

Here are some more programs that we'll be presenting (times to be announced!)

Lisa Rainen

Where do I fit in all of this? Finding social connections for highly gifted children (Saturday)

 

The mismatch between self and society: The intersection between gifted and gay (Sunday)

Elizabeth Mika

Dabrowski’s Theory of Positive Disintegration and the gifted – developmental and clinical considerations (In two parts, Saturday PM and Sunday PM)

Adult Program Descriptions (Partial Listing)

 

More will be available in the next few days. Really.

 

Lynnette Henderson: Neurobiological Correlates of Intelligence: Implications for Policy and Practice

In this address, I will (1) introduce how brain development is documented, (2) briefly review the processes of brain development, (3) discuss developmental and neurobiological differences which accompany higher levels of intelligence, (4) propose explanatory hypotheses for these differences, and (5) discuss the applications and future directions of this line of research and (6) propose applications to the policy and practice in education of intellectually gifted persons.

Lynnette Henderson is an educator with a passionate commitment to improving education for gifted individuals. Dr. Henderson pursues that agenda as a parent of 3 gifted girls, a former itinerant teacher of the gifted in Rutherford County, TN, a consultant to families of gifted children, an instructor of university courses on gifted education and an advocate at the state level. During her Master's work at Belmont University, she became interested in the neurobiological aspects of giftedness and pursued educational neuroscience as a minor during her doctoral work in Special Education at Vanderbilt University. Her other educational interests include Asperger Syndrome and Giftedness, and Early Childhood Education.

David Albert: Letters From The Front: A Dialog on Young Teens

“I just don’t know what happened. He used to be such a nice kid. Now, sometimes I feel I hardly recognize him.”  The younger teen years (ages 12-15) roll around, and homeschooling parents (like other parents) often don’t know what hit them!  This workshop examines the new and sometimes seemingly strange behaviors one encounters among young teens (with lots of examples), and explores the new relationships necessary for learning to flourish. We'll emphasize homeschooling, but there will be plenty as well for those not homeschooling. Time is always reserved for dialogue; parents (homeschooling or not) need to feel they are not alone!

David Albert: Writing, Reading, and All That

We are bombarded with techniques and methods for teaching what we all agree are critical skills. But how can we help our children learn that the written word is primarily about communication? Might it be possible to choose learning strategies based on an understanding of why an individual wants to read or write? Does this all really have to be so traumatic?  Provocative anecdotes and concrete nuts-and-bolts ideas -- from a professional author, editor, and writing coach.

David H. Albert holds degrees from Williams College, Oxford University, and the Committee on Social Thought, University of Chicago, but says, “the best education I ever received I get from my kids.” He writes a regular column – “My Word!” -- for Home Education Magazine.  He is author of two books on homeschooling: And the Skylark Sings with Me: Adventures in Homeschooling and Community-Based Education (New Society Publishers, 1999), as well as the forthcoming Homeschooling and the Voyage of Self-Discovery: A Journey of Original Seeking (Common Courage Press, 2003) David is also editor of the two-volume set The Healing Heart: Storytelling for Caring and Healthy Families and The Healing Heart: Storytelling for Strong and Healthy Communities (New Society, 2003). As founder of New Society Publishers, he was also publisher and editor of John Taylor Gatto’s Dumbing Us Down: The Hidden Curriculum of Compulsory Schooling, which has recently been reissued in a 10th Anniversary Edition. 

David lives in Olympia, Washington with his partner Ellen and two wonderful daughters, Aliyah (age 14) and Meera (12). When he is not learning with and from his kids, writing or telling stories, making music, or raising funds for child welfare or community development projects in India, he serves as Senior Planning and Policy Analyst for the Washington State Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse.  David is also an active member of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers).

Anna Caveney: Underachievement: Understanding Motivational Paralysis

Analyze the forces and traits that lead to this behavior.  Explore each, describing ways to be helpful, or at least not destructive.

Anna Caveney was the Director of the Junction program at MIT, through the MIT Educational Studies Program. Junction served motivated high school students, providing both academic and communications skill development during the summers. Anna has also served on the board of the Hollingworth Center for Highly Gifted Children. In addition, she is a former student of both the Illinois Math and Science Academy (IMSA) and the Massachusetts Academy for gifted students, formerly in Boston Currently, she is developing an organization to change the world.

Fernette Eide, M.D.: Functional Brain Imaging & The Different Ways We Think

Recent advances in brain imaging have allowed us to visualize differences in the way people think, memorize, and learn. In this talk I will provide an introduction to functional brain imaging, and relate some its amazing discoveries regarding gender- and multiple intelligences-related differences in learning.

Fernette Eide, M.D. is a neurologist at The Everett Clinic and at Providence General Hospital, both in Everett, WA. She previously was Assistant Professor and member of the Committee on Neurobiology at the University of Chicago. Fernette has two GT children, one of whom is GT/LD.

Nathan Levy: Practical Ways to Reach Highly Gifted Children in Class, School, and Out of School

This workshop explores numerous strategies, activities, and materials that have been used successfully by the speaker in a variety of settings in urban, suburban, and rural schools. The use of logic stories, creative writing, science and math explorations will be shared in numerous and very practical ways. Participants will leave with a plethora of strategies for making delivery of instruction more dynamic and fruitful.

Applying his experience from over 30 years as a teacher, principal, author and education consultant, Dr. Levy has traveled extensively across the United States as well as South America, Europe and Asia to bring his message related to thinking and creativity. His workshops cover many topics for a wide array of participants. He offers ideas on how to bring creativity and spontaneity to adults and children while stimulating integrated thinking.

Dr. Levy is the author of over forty books used with gifted children. His many publications assist people in their quest for new and creative ways to develop critical thinking skills.

Elizabeth Mika: Dabrowski’s Theory of Positive Disintegration and the gifted – developmental and clinical considerations

Do giftedness and overexcitabilities (OEs) go hand in hand? What are those OEs, anyway, and how good are they for you? What is Dabrowski’s model of development and mental health, and how it applies to the gifted? Can one grow through falling apart? How positive is positive disintegration? When do we pathologize exceptionality and when do we glamorize pathology? What’s asynchrony got to do with it? These and other issues related to Theory of Positive Disintegration will be explored during this session, based on the original writings of Kazimierz Dabrowski. Familiarity with the TPD concepts is helpful, but not necessary.

Elizabeth Mika, M.A., LCPC, decided to obtain her clinical psychology training after discovering K. Dabrowski’s writings a long time ago. She presently works as a tester and consultant to gifted children and their families in the Chicago area. Her other occupations have included mental health counseling, writing, translating, and mothering two gifted sons.

Debbie Notkin: The Role of Imaginative Literature in Forming Gender Identity/Gender Expectations

Children read to collect insight in how to see themselves and the world. To believe that they are part of the human family, they need images in fiction which represent their experiences of themselves. Simultaneously, to understand and appreciate the diversity and richness of the world, they need fictional representations of that diversity. Since the speculative realms of fantasy and science fiction are so attractive to many children, it is especially important to understand how this literature can tackle the real problems of children's lives, both mythologicallly and directly, in the realm of gender along with many other realms.

Debbie Notkin edited Flying Cups and Saucers: Gender Explorations in Science Fiction and Fantasy. As a professional fantasy and science fiction editor for Tor Books since 1988, Notkin is deeply familiar with how gender issues play out in imaginative literature. She is Chair of the Motherboard of the James Tiptree Jr. Literary Award Council (www.tiptree.org), a nonprofit corporation that gives awards to works of speculative fiction that explore and expand gender roles. In addition, Notkin works closely with photographer Laurie Toby Edison on books and exhibitions examining body image and gender (www.candydarling.com/lte).

She lives in Oakland, California.

Lisa Rainen: Where do I fit in all of this? Finding social connections for highly gifted children

The lack of fit between the highly gifted student and lock-stepped school programs is seen in more dimensions than just the intellectual. So often highly gifted students have a difficult time finding a social fit, particularly if they are kept with age-mates who are not ability peers. Explore the reasons behind this lack of social fit, and work together to develop specific strategies to find positive social situations and potentially close friendships for highly gifted children. Professionals and parents can gain ideas for interventions that help highly gifted students find their social fit. We will develop tools for advocacy, such as ways of refuting the common claim that accelerating students puts them at a social disadvantage.

Lisa Rainen: The mismatch between self and society: The intersection between gifted and gay

Highly and profoundly gifted children may share situations similar to youth that are gay, bisexual, or transgender, including closeting one's self, severe ostracism, and lack of safety at schools.  It seems almost inevitable that these children, particularly young adults, will therefore deal with issues of homosexuality in a more personal and, of course, a more intense manner than other children. Perceived androgyny in interests, concentration on moral situations, and other common characteristics of gifted children may get them involved in issues of homosexuality in schools.  Additionally, there is a possibility that the child who has more self-knowledge may know their own orientation earlier than others and thus face these issues overtly as well as subtly.   The radically accelerated student may be facing sexuality and sexual orientation in their ability peers earlier as well.   The mixture of all of these factors requires response from teachers, schools, and parents to help make it safe for highly gifted children to deal with these issues in healthy ways.

Lisa Rainen entered the University of Washington through their Early Entrance program for gifted high school students, and earned a B.A. in English there. She went on to get a M.A.Ed in Gifted Education from the College of William and Mary. Lisa has just completed her first year as a teacher in a 5th grade gifted and talented classroom in Wausau, Wisconsin.

Michael Rios and Sarah Taub: Being Different: How extreme giftedness changes the way we, as adults, perceive, believe, work, play, and love

What happens when gifted children grow up? We will use small groups, and open discussion to explore the impact of overexcitabilities, school experiences, and other differences on EG/PG adults’ friendships, careers, and family relationships. The workshop will also address existing research, resources, and next steps for participants.

Sarah Taub and Michael Rios: Being Different: Personal Explorations and Strategies for Highly Gifted Adults

This workshop provides an opportunity for discussion and personal exploration of the topics developed in the previous workshop. Through a mixture of small groups, large group discussion, and brainstorming we will create an interactive space for participants to think and talk about the impact of overexcitabilities and other differences on their own lives.

The two 'Being Different' workshops complement each other. The first provides an overview; the second offers an opportunity to explore how these issues have impacted the participants. Attendance at the first workshop is helpful but not necessary to get full benefit from the second.

Michael Rios is the parent of profoundly gifted children, has published on giftedness, and has done extensive healing work with gifted adults.

Sarah Taub is a professor of linguistics at Gallaudet University. She also teaches martial arts and co-counseling techniques.

Josh Shaine: What to Look For at Your First Conference

This will include a brief presentation on terminology you are likely to hear during the weekend, which presentations are aimed at newcomers, and other introductory material. A good chunk of this period will be spent doing Q&A with the attendees.

Josh Shaine is Josh Shaine. Hey, someone had to be. He's also an accomplished teacher and chess player, and has been known to organize a conference or three.

Kara Sheehan: Cuckoo Eggs in the Family Nest: Working with our beliefs and emotional responses

A theory on the formation of certain negative beliefs about ourselves, most often made in childhood, will be presented in the context of a spiritual philosophy. The analogy of the Cuckoo Egg offers a playful yet profound metaphor for understanding ourselves at a deep level and for improving communication with loved ones through humor and personal responsibility. Focus will be on increasing awareness of our beliefs and emotional habits in order to cope with intensities and find the healing path out of stuck and painful places. Seeing Life as our mirror and consciously creating the experiences we desire are the goals of this insight-oriented approach. Tools for increasing happiness and family bonding will be discussed.

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